Month: August 2020

Three Texans, One New Yorker Indicted for Conspiracy to Sell Sanctioned Iranian Petroleum to Refinery in China for Millions in Profit | OPA | Department of Justice

Assistant Attorney General for National Security John C. Demers and U.S. Attorney for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania William M. McSwain announced that the following defendants were indicted on

Source: Three Texans, One New Yorker Indicted for Conspiracy to Sell Sanctioned Iranian Petroleum to Refinery in China for Millions in Profit | OPA | Department of Justice

An Evaluation of CBO’s Past Revenue Projections | Congressional Budget Office

In the course of producing baseline projections of the federal budget, the Congressional Budget Office regularly projects what federal revenues would be in the current year and in the next 10 years if current laws generally remained unchanged. To refine its methods and improve its projections, the agency routinely assesses the accuracy of its past projections.

Source: An Evaluation of CBO’s Past Revenue Projections | Congressional Budget Office

An anti-heroine for our epic times | Neos Kosmos

In this age of populist monsters it is time to revisit Three Penny Opera.

And listen to Ella Fitzgerald…
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Threepenny_Opera

She sang Mac The Knife in Berlin in 1960. The audience loved it. The song she sang was from a famous play, called the Three Penny Opera. One of Germany’s most accomplished and brilliant writers, Bertolt Brecht had authored the piece from an earlier play. It is still considered a masterpiece and every author and stage actor knows it well

It was also fitting for the time, a time of sheer madness, of nuclear war, and competing ideologies that were irrelevant, but threatened to end humanity in an instant. Across the United States, children were being taught to duck and cover, a pathetically useless response to a thermonuclear attack. The world had gone completely mad.

In Three Penny Opera, Bertolt Brecht told a tale that stretches back a hundred years.  In the past it was called ‘The Beggars Opera’ by the Englishman John Gay. The story was about poverty in England. Gay’s work included songs to which Brecht added. It played to great success in Germany. The work became a sort of socialist statement on the failures of capitalism. No one seems to have noticed that fact in Nazi Germany.

This was in a time of hyperinflation and starvation in the streets of Berlin. This was post WWI. It was a perfect time for authoritarianism. And he appeared, promising greatness, freedom, a return to old times, when good Germans were young and prosperous, and Jews were not a problem. He would fix things. He would make Germany great again.

It did not work out that way. The country was divided into the capitalists and the socialists, with Berlin squarely in the middle, a golden prize for the conquerers. 

After the second Great War, Berlin was not a city, it was a two-penny opera in itself. Two great powers determined to control Europe faced each other here. Everywhere was madness. American jazz sang in the belly of authoritarian promise. Ella Fitzgerald sang to one side. Vladimir Lenin sang to the other. No wonder those stuck in East Germany tried to escape. When you hear Ella, what else is there to think about?

The wall began to separate them. In time, it would separate a generation. Little wonder we don’t think walls work anymore. Centuries of failures have taught us well. We cannot escape each other.

Australian perfomer Paul Capsis talk to FOTIS KAPETOPOULOS about upcoming star turn The Threepenny Opera at the Malthouse

Source: An anti-heroine for our epic times | Neos Kosmos

Three Penny Opera
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Threepenny_Opera