Leadership

Forgetting Who You Work For

Did you ever work for technology? Chances are you have and may not have noticed it. Another question I could ask is, have you ever worked for the process and forgotten who you work for?

A few years ago, we were told by our customers that we were not meeting their expectations. This threw IS management into a tizzy. How could this be? We work so hard, and we strive to satisfy your every need? Where have we failed you?

The wringing of hands and mea culpa’s went on and on, but as always this resulted in nothing, so management did what management always does when faced with truths. They held high level meetings.

They should have gotten high before the meetings. Just kidding. High level meetings are useless unless there are many low-level meetings where you ask all-important questions like, “Why do you hate us?”

Eventually you find people who will tell you the truth, but not before you go through a very many people who, like most of us, don’t. We say things like, “Well, you folks try, and that is important.” That same person gutted your work in a survey, and that is the reason you stand before them, wringing your hands, and with each faux pat on the head, you hands wring a bit less.

So when you do run into someone who does not mind telling you that you suck at what you do, that person becomes an outlier. In management’s head, the linear regression is clear. There are only a few bad apples that hate us. To the rest of them, we are okay.

But given the poor rating, you have to discover some thing that you did wrong, even though at this point you don’t believe in your heart of managerial hearts that you did anything wrong. You have to find a sin for which you will do penance, without really admitting to yourself that you sinned at all.

By some real stretches of the imagination, you dig deep into your MBA and find a phrase that both exonerates you and is worthy of penance that only a good manager could be found guilty of. We did not align ourselves with our customers.

What the hell does that mean? It is both a compliment, you were working hard, and a criticism, you weren’t working on the right things. It is also a cop-out. You never found out what you were doing wrong, so you invented something.

In our case, the answer resulted in an enormous amount of hard work, We spent months on aligning. We hired ITIL experts who told us how we needed to define ourselves, what we do, and how to measure how great we are.

Let that sink in. We did not ever look for the truth. We looked for better metrics on how good we were doing. We aligned with nothing.

The Latest: White House suspends pass of CNN’s Acosta

The Press have become braver, and no one is more brave than Jim Acosta. Okay, Katy Tur. Caitlin Collins? Geez, they are all getting really ballsy!
But consider, if the President will not respect the office of the Presidency, why should the Press? He lies. He attacks the straight press and favors the ridiculous right.
After two years, the shine has come off this turd.
The White House reaction is to kick them out of the White House Press pool. We believe they should all quit in protest.

The White House says it has suspended the press pass of CNN White House correspondent Jim Acosta.

Source: The Latest: White House suspends pass of CNN’s Acosta

Beating yourself up is not as helpful as you think — Quartz

“Neurologists Find Brain Still Shows Signs Of Self-Criticism Minutes After Death,” reads a recent satirical headline from the Onion. When I read it, I thought it was real. Because I had also recently read a book by end-of-life care pioneer Frank Ostaseski, who wrote that people in their last moments often “tell themselves that they’re…

via Beating yourself up is not as helpful as you think — Quartz

The 9-to-5 workday isn’t just hated—it’s obsolete — Quartz

We work all the time now, and we play all the time. That drives some managers crazy, but they need to get over it. They are winning. We are working more.

From Quartz

Does anybody like the modern work day? Getting out of bed and to the office by eight in the morning. Staying until five. Five days a week. With two rest days. Then back at it again. Every week. Do we really like that? Because we sure do complain about it a lot. It’s embedded in…

via The 9-to-5 workday isn’t just hated—it’s obsolete — Quartz

Almost 70% of US managers are scared to talk to their employees — Quartz

Being a manager inevitably entails an uncomfortable talk with employees, be it a bad performance review, a delicate personal situation, or unpleasant news from higher-ups. But an astounding number of managers report that the hardest part about talking to employees is talking to them at all. In 2016, a survey of more than 2,000 US…

via Almost 70% of US managers are scared to talk to their employees — Quartz

What to do before a vacation to make sure coming back to work isn’t pure agony — Quartz

I went on vacation last month. In the final 15 minutes before leaving my desk for a week, I set out-of-office messages on Slack and Gmail, made an Evernote to-do list for my first day back, and closed my laptop, confident I’d return rested, organized, and ready to jump back into work. Vacation is over…

via What to do before a vacation to make sure coming back to work isn’t pure agony — Quartz

‘Chinafrica’ is a macro megatrend set to impact everything from Silicon Valley to Wall Street | TechCrunch

While America isolates, China moves into spaces no one ever expected them to go. The reason is simple. Economically simple. Make friends with emerging nations, and make buyers eventually. We are witnessing the emergence of the next great leader of the free world, and they are anything but free. This from TechCrunch.

VCs and startup founders rarely pay attention to slow-moving but powerful macro global events, especially with so many fast-moving things to focus on at the micro level, like technology, teams and trends.

Source: ‘Chinafrica’ is a macro megatrend set to impact everything from Silicon Valley to Wall Street | TechCrunch

Here’s What Managers Should Never Do When Looking for Job Candidates — Fortune

The Entrepreneur Insiders network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in America’s startup scene contribute answers to timely questions about entrepreneurship and careers. Today’s answer to the question “How do you build a strong team?” is written by David Baszucki, founder and CEO of Roblox. Great teams are built intentionally,…

via Here’s What Managers Should Never Do When Looking for Job Candidates — Fortune

How Perfectionism Can Keep You From Success — Fortune

The Leadership Insiders network is an online community where the most thoughtful and influential people in business contribute answers to timely questions about careers and leadership. Today's answer to the question: How do you embrace imperfection as part of professional development? is written by Sarah Kauss, founder and CEO of S'well. I'm a perfectionist. I…

via How Perfectionism Can Keep You From Success — Fortune